How To Write Business Proposals Strategically & Persuasively

Imagine walking into a room full of potential clients, armed with a proposal that has the power to captivate them and secure their business. 

Whether you’re a seasoned entrepreneur or a newcomer to the world of business, crafting an effective proposal is crucial for establishing strong client relationships and fostering business growth. 

The art of writing persuasive business proposals is a skill that can open doors to success and growth for your company. And a well-written proposal can lead to better decision-making around what to offer each prospect, improved outcomes for your clients, and a secure future for your business.

In this guide, we will explore the key elements of a persuasive business proposal, from the executive summary to the call to action.

What Is A Business Proposal?

A business proposal is a document that outlines a specific product or service offered by a business to a prospective client or customer. It’s essentially a sales pitch, detailing what the business can offer and why it can do it better than any competitor. Business proposals are often a key step in the complex sales process—i.e., whenever a buyer considers more than price in a purchase.

You can think of a business proposal like a well outlined sales call in written form that explains what the company can offer and why it’s the best choice compared to others. When people want to buy something but need more information than just the price, they often look at a business proposal.

What’s The Difference Between Solicited And Unsolicited Business Proposals?

There are two types of business proposals: solicited and unsolicited.

A solicited business proposal is written when a company is asked for one. On the other hand, an unsolicited proposal is sent to potential clients who haven’t asked for it.

These can be a bit harder to write as they need more research about the potential client to understand what they need and convince them that the company’s services can help them.

What Is The Goal Of A Writing A Business Proposal?

The goal of a business proposal is to convince the possible client to choose the company’s products or services. To do this well, a business proposal must:

  1. Point out a problem that needs fixing.
  2. Suggest a practical way to fix the problem.
  3. Show why the company is the right one to fix it.
  4. Give details about the cost of the fix.
  5. Explain any possible advantages or gains.

What are the key elements of a persuasive business proposal?

A persuasive business proposal includes an executive summary, problem/need identification, proposed solution, qualifications, pricing, call to action, and conclusion. Each component plays a vital role in formulating a convincing case for your product or service, addressing the client’s needs, and highlighting the value of your solution.

Why is it important to write a persuasive business proposal?

Writing a persuasive business proposal is crucial for establishing strong client relationships, fostering business growth, and ensuring overall success. A persuasive proposal can lead to better decision-making and improved outcomes for your business by effectively addressing the client’s needs and showcasing the value of your solution.

How can I create an effective executive summary for my business proposal?

To create an effective executive summary, provide a brief and concise overview of the proposal, outlining the problem, solution, and benefits. This summary should engage the reader and persuade them to continue reading. Avoid overpromising and use clear language to connect emotionally and intellectually with the reader.

What should I consider when defining the problem or need in my business proposal?

When defining the problem or need, ensure that it is well-defined and relates directly to the client’s business context. Use the client’s language and perspective to demonstrate a deep understanding of their challenges. Avoid defining the problem solely from your perspective, as the proposal should focus on what the client needs to solve.

How can I showcase my team’s qualifications in a business proposal?

Showcase your team’s qualifications by providing evidence of your past successes, highlighting your team’s expertise, and including testimonials or reviews from previous clients. Be transparent and verifiable in your claims, as overstating your capabilities can lead to skepticism and harm your reputation.

What are some tips for presenting pricing in a business proposal?

When presenting pricing, be transparent and detailed, offering a clear understanding of the value the client is getting for their investment. Provide several pricing options or packages to fit the client’s budget and needs. Frame your pricing in terms of value and avoid hidden costs to build trust and facilitate negotiation.

How can I create a strong call to action in my business proposal?

Create a strong call to action by summarizing the key points of your proposal, stating the next steps the client needs to take, and making it easy for them to contact you. Use active language and encourage the client to act soon, subtly emphasizing the cost of inaction. Avoid being too pushy or aggressive, respecting the client’s decision-making process and timeline.

What are the key elements of a persuasive business proposal?

A persuasive business proposal encompasses an executive summary, problem/need identification, proposed solution, qualifications, pricing, call to action, and conclusion. Each of these components plays a vital role in formulating a convincing case for your product or service, addressing the client’s needs, and highlighting the value of your solution.

The Executive Summary is the first impression the reader will have of your proposal. It should clearly and concisely summarize the rest of the content, outlining the problem, solution, and benefits. It’s your opportunity to engage the reader and persuade them to continue reading.

Problem/Need Identification is where you demonstrate a deep understanding of the client’s challenges. The problem needs to be well-defined and relate directly to the client’s business context. If the client doesn’t see their problem in your proposal, they won’t see the need for your solution.

The Proposed Solution section is the heart of your proposal. It should clearly describe how you intend to solve the problem or meet the need, detailing the benefits the client will receive from your service or product. Be specific, use clear language, and highlight the unique aspects of your solution.

Your Qualifications are a crucial part of building trust with the client. Provide evidence of your capability and expertise, showcasing your success stories and credentials. The reader needs to be convinced that you are the best choice for implementing the solution.

The Pricing section should be transparent and detailed, offering a clear understanding of the value the client is getting for their investment. Remember, the aim is not to be the cheapest option, but to provide the best value. Be open to negotiation and flexible pricing options where appropriate.

The Call to Action is your chance to guide the reader towards the next step. Whether it’s setting up a meeting, signing a contract, or asking them to get in touch, make it clear what you want the reader to do next.

Finally, the Conclusion of the business proposal is your chance to leave a lasting impression. Summarize the main points of your proposal, reiterate the benefits of your solution, thank the reader for their time, and leave them with a clear next step.

How To Write A Business Proposal

This checklist will guide you through the process of writing a persuasive business proposal. It highlights the key elements to include and provides actionable tips to ensure your proposal is effective and engaging. Use this checklist to create a compelling proposal that addresses your client’s needs and showcases the value of your solution.

1. Write the Executive Summary

Start by providing a brief overview of the proposal, where you outline the problem that is being addressed, propose the solution, and highlight the benefits of the solution. This concise and cogent summary sets the tone and provides context for the rest of the proposal.

For instance, if your business provides IT consulting services, and you’re proposing a digital transformation project for a client still using outdated systems, the summary might underline the issues they’re currently facing (e.g., slow processing, software incompatibilities, increased security risks). It could then present your solution (system upgrade, cloud migration, security enhancements), and underscore the potential benefits (improved efficiency, modern capabilities, increased security).

Remember, your executive summary needs to be crisp, concise, and engaging. It should steer clear of too much technical jargon. Instead, use this section to connect emotionally and intellectually with the reader, make them understand why the problem is worth solving, and how your solution is the best fit.

A common mistake to avoid is overpromising in the executive summary. While it’s important to showcase the benefits of your solution, it’s equally important to remain realistic about what can be achieved. Overstating benefits can lead to disappointment and a lack of trust if the proposal is accepted and the results do not live up to the promises.

2. Define the Problem or Need

Clearly define the problem or need that the proposal is addressing. Elaborate on the impact of the problem on the client and quantify the cost of the issue. This helps emphasize the urgency and relevance of your proposed solution.

For example, if the client’s outdated CRM system is leading to missed sales opportunities, provide concrete data such as decreased conversion rates or loss in revenue due to system inefficiencies. This will not only make the problem more tangible but will also help the client understand the cost of inaction.

Use your client’s language and perspective when defining the problem. This shows that you understand their world and can relate to their challenges. This empathy can help build a stronger connection with the client.

A common mistake to avoid is defining the problem solely from your perspective. Remember, the proposal is not about what you want to sell; it’s about what the client needs to solve.

3. Propose the Solution

Here, you need to detail your solution to the problem or need. Explain how your solution works and highlight the benefits it brings. This section should make a strong case for why your solution is the best choice for addressing the client’s problem.

For instance, you could present a step-by-step implementation plan for the new CRM system, detailing how each feature addresses the issues outlined. Then, showcase the potential benefits, such as increased conversion rates, improved customer service, and enhanced data analysis capabilities.

Remember to focus on benefits, not just features. The client is interested in how your solution improves their business. Always connect the capabilities of your product or service with the value it brings to the client.

Be cautious not to overcomplicate your solution. It needs to be comprehensive but also understandable and realistic. The client might be put off by a solution that seems too complex or hard to implement.

4. Detail your team’s Qualifications

It’s important to demonstrate your qualifications and capability to solve the problem. Provide evidence of your past successes and highlight your team’s expertise. This will build trust and confidence in your proposal.

You could provide case studies of similar projects you have successfully completed, highlighting how those clients benefited from your services. Also, don’t shy away from showcasing your team’s qualifications, relevant experiences, and unique skills.

Providing social proof in the form of testimonials or reviews from previous clients can significantly boost your credibility. Make sure these are authentic and relevant to the proposal at hand.

Be careful not to make unsubstantiated claims about your qualifications. Everything you state needs to be verifiable. Overstating your capabilities can lead to skepticism and could harm your reputation.

5. Clearly state the Pricing

Make sure to clearly state your pricing structure. Offer a variety of pricing options to fit the client’s budget and explain the value of your solution and how it justifies the price. Transparency in pricing can help build trust and facilitate negotiation.

It could be beneficial to present several pricing options or packages, perhaps tiered according to different levels of service or product bundles. This gives the client a choice and allows them to select an option that best suits their budget and needs.

Always frame your pricing in terms of value. Make it clear how the investment in your solution translates into benefits for the client. This could be in terms of cost savings, increased revenue, or other measurable outcomes.

A pitfall to avoid is hidden costs. Make sure all costs are included in the proposal, and there are no surprises. This transparency will help build trust and avoid misunderstandings later on.

6. Include a strong Call to Action

This section should summarize the key points of your proposal. State the next steps that the client needs to take and make it easy for them to contact you. A clear call to action can guide the client towards agreement and implementation.

For example, you might ask the client to review the proposal and arrange a meeting to discuss it further, providing a direct contact method such as an email or a phone number.

The call to action should be clear, specific, and easy to follow. Use active language and encourage the client to act soon, subtly emphasizing the cost of inaction.

Be careful not to be too pushy or aggressive in your call to action. It’s important to respect the client’s decision-making process and timeline.

7. Restate the Benefits in a Conclusion 

In your conclusion, restate the benefits of your solution. Thank the client for their time and consideration. Also, invite the client to contact you with any questions. This leaves the conversation open for further discussions.

An effective conclusion could recap the main advantages of your proposed solution, reassuring the client about the potential benefits they can derive from your services.

Use the conclusion to reinforce your commitment to the client and their needs. A personal note of thanks can leave a positive impression and foster a good relationship.

Be careful not to introduce new information in the conclusion. It’s meant to summarize and close the proposal, so bringing in new details here can confuse the client and may distract from the main points of the proposal.

How can I ensure my business proposal is well-structured and easy to understand?

To ensure your business proposal is well-structured and easy to understand, follow a clear and logical format. Begin with an executive summary that provides an overview of the problem, proposed solution, and benefits. Next, define the problem or need, propose the solution, detail your team’s qualifications, and clearly state the pricing. Include a strong call to action and restate the benefits in a conclusion. This structure will guide your reader through the proposal and make it easy for them to grasp the key points.

How can I make my business proposal stand out from the competition?

To make your business proposal stand out from the competition, focus on the unique aspects of your solution and the value it brings to the client. Use clear and concise language, avoid jargon, and provide evidence to support your claims. Showcase your team’s expertise and qualifications, and include testimonials or case studies from previous clients. Be transparent with your pricing and offer flexible options to suit the client’s budget. Finally, ensure your proposal is well-written, proofread, and visually appealing to create a professional impression.

What are some common mistakes to avoid when writing a business proposal?

Some common mistakes to avoid when writing a business proposal include overpromising in the executive summary, defining the problem solely from your perspective, overcomplicating the solution, making unsubstantiated claims about your qualifications, hiding costs in the pricing, being too pushy in the call to action, and introducing new information in the conclusion. By avoiding these pitfalls, you can create a more persuasive and effective business proposal.

What are some additional tips for writing persuasive business proposals?

Start by understanding your audience. What are their needs and pain points? Clearly state the problem that your solution addresses. Highlight the benefits of your solution and how it will improve your client’s business. Be sure to include evidence to support your claims. Proofread your proposal carefully before submitting it. By following these tips, you can write persuasive business proposals that will help you close more deals.

Take Your Business Proposal Writing Skills to the Next Level

Writing a persuasive business proposal involves understanding your audience, clearly stating the problem, proposing a well-structured solution, showcasing your qualifications, being transparent with pricing, and including a strong call to action. 

By following these guidelines and avoiding common mistakes, you can create compelling proposals that will help you close more deals and grow your business.

How Hiring An Executive Assistant Can Help You Scale Your Business

Persona’s Executive Assistants can help you scale and manage tasks related to writing persuasive business proposals. With our rigorous vetting process and focus on hiring only the top 0.1% of applicants, you can trust that our Executive Assistants are truly exceptional.

Ready to really take your business to the next level? 

Our Executive Assistants are trusted by leading brands and companies, and have been carefully selected for their writing ability, communication skills, problem-solving capabilities, and reliability. Additionally, our unique behavioral assessment software ensures that each hire is a good fit for their role, making them reliable, professional, hard-working, and excellent team players.

By partnering with Persona, you can delegate tasks related to crafting compelling business proposals, allowing you to focus on other aspects of your business. Our Executive Assistants can help you:

  • Research and understand your target audience
  • Define the problem and propose well-structured solutions
  • Showcase your qualifications and expertise
  • Develop transparent pricing strategies
  • Create strong calls to action and persuasive conclusions
  • Proofread and edit your proposals for maximum impact

Don’t let the burden of writing business proposals hold you back from achieving your business goals. Let Persona’s Executive Assistants help you scale and succeed. To learn more about how our Executive Assistants can support your business, contact us today.

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